Who is an African? by Raymond Suttner (Daily Maverick), 04 June 2014

9 June 2014

What we call one another and how we identify ourselves in South Africa is an expression of a complex relationship of sameness and difference, belonging and exclusion. By RAYMOND SUTTNER.

How we are “named” and how we identify ourselves is not whimsical, but carries the weight of historical experience.

Because terminology is seldom neutral we need to examine why some usage is adopted or disappears and what purpose using or not using one or other term serves.

Way forward lies with policy changes, not project roll-outs by Steven Friedman (BDlive), 17 June 2014

17 June 2014

THE state of the nation address many in the mainstream want to hear is not the one the country needs to hear. Tuesday’s address should help answer two important questions.

Does the new government want to bargain with the business sector and other interests to chart a new path for the economy, or does it believe it can fix problems on its own? Are poverty and inequality still high on its agenda or has its attention turned elsewhere? Much of the debate wants to hear an address that does not "waffle" about policy but promises to "get things done".

5 things to remember when researching Africa by Melanie Archer (Africa Research Institute), 19 March 2014

6 May 2014

On Monday 17th March, I attended a conference to showcase PhD research organised by the Africa Research Student Network, which provides a forum for London-based, Africa-focused research students to discuss and learn from one another’s work. The keynote address was delivered by Dr. Funmi Olonisakin, founding Director of the African Leadership Centre; here are five things to remember when researching Africa, inspired by Dr Olonisakin’s talk.

1. Africa does not exist in a vacuum

Provincial elites use Zuma as Trojan horse to hit Treasury by Ivor Chipkin, Joel Pearson and Sarita Pillay (BDLive), 17 December 2015

18 December 2015

President Jacob Zuma listens to the state of the nation debate in Parliament. Picture: GCIS

AFTER Nhlanhla Nene was fired, cyber and print commentary, searching for an explanation, grasped at several terms: state capture, cronyism, patronage. The essence of the argument is that President Jacob Zuma’s actions were motivated by self-interest and the interests of family, friends and associates.

Thwarted attack reins in the ANC’s rural barons by Steven Friedman (BDLive), 17 December 2015

18 December 2015

Protesters wave banners and flags calling for the resignation of President Jacob Zuma in Johannesburg on Wednesday. Picture: AFP PHOTO/MUJAHID SAFODIEN

SOMETIMES, failing to see a society’s strengths can be as much of a problem as ignoring its weaknesses. Which is why much of the reaction to Pravin Gordhan’s return as finance minister did us no favours by presenting a victory for SA as a defeat.

NEWS ANALYSIS: Two cases cast their shadows on Zuma by Franny Rabkin (BDLive), 17 December 2015

18 December 2015

COURT DATES: The ‘spy tapes’ and ‘pay back the money’ matters, in which president Zuma is embroiled, come up in the new year. Picture: SUNDAY TIMES

PRESIDENT Jacob Zuma is no stranger to court, but in February and March, two cases will be heard that could have significant personal consequences for him. After more than six years of legal wrangling, the court case that could lead to Mr Zuma facing corruption charges once again has finally been set down to be heard in March.

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